Procedures for Port State Control 2017 - What's New in the 2018 Edition?

Port State Control (PSC) is the inspection of foreign ships in national ports to substantiate that the state of the ship and its equipment comply with the demands of international regulations and that the ship is manned and utilized in compliance with these rules.


Differences in the 2018 Edition:

The resolution is intended to provide fundamental instructions on the conduct of port state control inspections in order to provide consistency in how such inspections are carried out and in the identification of ship deficiencies, its equipment or its crew.

In section 1.2, the application of the procedures is extended to:

  • The Convention on The International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea, 1972
  • The International Convention on Civil Liability for Oil Pollution Damage, 1969
  • The Protocol of 1992 to amend the International Convention on Civil Liability for Oil Pollution Damage, 1969
  • The International Convention on Civil Liability for Bunker Oil Pollution Damage, 2001
  • The International Convention for the Control and Management of Ship’s Ballast Water and Sediments, 2004
  • The Nairobi International Convention on the Removal of Wrecks, 2007

 

Why is it needed?

According to the IMO, port state inspections were initially intended to be a backup to flag state implementation, but experience has shown that they can be exceedingly effective. This guarantees that as many ships as possible are inspected, but at the same time prevents ships from being delayed by unnecessary inspections. A second line of defense or “safety net” is therefore necessary in order to preserve the safety and security of life, property and the marine environment.

 

 

Who does the Procedures for Port State Control apply to?

All ships sailing in international waters are required to comply with the international codes and conventions. Ships should be maintained at a particular standard by the combined efforts of flag states, shipping company administration, and the ship’s master.

 

Where can you find it?

Contact us here at American Nautical Services to receive your copy of the Procedures for Port State Control 2017, 2018 Edition or you can order it online with us.

Port State Control (PSC) is the inspection of foreign ships in national ports to substantiate that the state of the ship and its equipment comply with the demands of international regulations and that the ship is manned and utilized in compliance with these rules.


Differences in the 2018 Edition:

The resolution is intended to provide fundamental instructions on the conduct of port state control inspections in order to provide consistency in how such inspections are carried out and in the identification of ship deficiencies, its equipment or its crew.

In section 1.2, the application of the procedures is extended to:

  • The Convention on The International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea, 1972
  • The International Convention on Civil Liability for Oil Pollution Damage, 1969
  • The Protocol of 1992 to amend the International Convention on Civil Liability for Oil Pollution Damage, 1969
  • The International Convention on Civil Liability for Bunker Oil Pollution Damage, 2001
  • The International Convention for the Control and Management of Ship’s Ballast Water and Sediments, 2004
  • The Nairobi International Convention on the Removal of Wrecks, 2007

 

Why is it needed?

According to the IMO, port state inspections were initially intended to be a backup to flag state implementation, but experience has shown that they can be exceedingly effective. This guarantees that as many ships as possible are inspected, but at the same time prevents ships from being delayed by unnecessary inspections. A second line of defense or “safety net” is therefore necessary in order to preserve the safety and security of life, property and the marine environment.

 

 

Who does the Procedures for Port State Control apply to?

All ships sailing in international waters are required to comply with the international codes and conventions. Ships should be maintained at a particular standard by the combined efforts of flag states, shipping company administration, and the ship’s master.

 

Where can you find it?

Contact us here at American Nautical Services to receive your copy of the Procedures for Port State Control 2017, 2018 Edition or you can order it online with us.