SOLAS (Safety of Life at Sea) consolidated 2014 released from IMO

The recent release of SOLAS Consolidated, 2014 edition from the

International Maritime Organization (IMO) marks a new 

chapter in the evolution of safety regulations for the international

maritime community. SOLAS 2014 edition is complied

to provide a simple reference to SOLAS requirements, contain a

consolidated text of the 1974 SOLAS convention, the

1988 SOLAS protocol, and all subsequent amendments in force

as on July 1st, 2014.

 

Content of SOLAS 2014 edition:

 

SOLAS has been complied into two main parts:

 

Part 1: Contains the 1974 SOLAS Convention and 1988 SOLAS Protocol articles, requirements and certificates.

 

Part 2: Contains a list of certificates and documents to be carried on board ships and a list of resolutions adopted by the aforementioned SOLAS Conferences.

 

Operational requirements in SOLAS are in general applicable to all ships, while requirements for ship construction and equipment depend on when the ship was constructed. Previous texts of the 1974 SOLAS convention and 1988 SOLAS protocol should be consulted for verification of construction and equipment requirements if a ship was constructed before 2014. 

 

This edition of SOLAS reproduces the text of the 1974 SOLAS Convention and 1988 SOLAS Protocol and also includes some modifications to amendments. It should be noted that some minor editorial changes were made but carefully done as to not alter the substance of the text. These editorial changes were made with the goal of achieving consistency between text from the 1974 SOLAS Convention and the 1988 SOLAS Protocol and other various amendments. The editorial changes are:

 

1. The decimal numbering system used for paragraphs and sub-paragraphs of regulations in chapters 11-1, 11-2, III, IV, V, VI, and VII were rewritten. The original numbering system was retained for chapters I and VIII.

 

2. References to regulations, paragraphs, and chapters in the texts adopted in the 1981 and subsequent amendments use an abbreviated form (e.g. "regulation 11-2/55.5"), whereas the original reference system is retained in unamended regulations.

 

3. The term tons gross tonnage has been changed to gross tonnage. (See resolution A.493(XII))

 

4. The metric value system have been used in accordance with resolution A.351(IX).

 

History of Solas

The first version of SOLAS was adopted in 1914 following the sinking of the Titanic with the loss of more than 1,500 lives. Since then there have been four more versions of SOLAS. The current SOLAS was produced from the International Convention on Safety of Life at Sea, which was convened by the International Maritime Organization. The International Convention of Safety of Life at Sea was adopted on November 1, 1974 and went into force on May 25, 1980. The main objective of SOLAS is to protect mariners through legislation of regulations with enforcement from contracting governments abroad.

 

 

 

The recent release of SOLAS Consolidated, 2014 edition from the

International Maritime Organization (IMO) marks a new 

chapter in the evolution of safety regulations for the international

maritime community. SOLAS 2014 edition is complied

to provide a simple reference to SOLAS requirements, contain a

consolidated text of the 1974 SOLAS convention, the

1988 SOLAS protocol, and all subsequent amendments in force

as on July 1st, 2014.

 

Content of SOLAS 2014 edition:

 

SOLAS has been complied into two main parts:

 

Part 1: Contains the 1974 SOLAS Convention and 1988 SOLAS Protocol articles, requirements and certificates.

 

Part 2: Contains a list of certificates and documents to be carried on board ships and a list of resolutions adopted by the aforementioned SOLAS Conferences.

 

Operational requirements in SOLAS are in general applicable to all ships, while requirements for ship construction and equipment depend on when the ship was constructed. Previous texts of the 1974 SOLAS convention and 1988 SOLAS protocol should be consulted for verification of construction and equipment requirements if a ship was constructed before 2014. 

 

This edition of SOLAS reproduces the text of the 1974 SOLAS Convention and 1988 SOLAS Protocol and also includes some modifications to amendments. It should be noted that some minor editorial changes were made but carefully done as to not alter the substance of the text. These editorial changes were made with the goal of achieving consistency between text from the 1974 SOLAS Convention and the 1988 SOLAS Protocol and other various amendments. The editorial changes are:

 

1. The decimal numbering system used for paragraphs and sub-paragraphs of regulations in chapters 11-1, 11-2, III, IV, V, VI, and VII were rewritten. The original numbering system was retained for chapters I and VIII.

 

2. References to regulations, paragraphs, and chapters in the texts adopted in the 1981 and subsequent amendments use an abbreviated form (e.g. "regulation 11-2/55.5"), whereas the original reference system is retained in unamended regulations.

 

3. The term tons gross tonnage has been changed to gross tonnage. (See resolution A.493(XII))

 

4. The metric value system have been used in accordance with resolution A.351(IX).

 

History of Solas

The first version of SOLAS was adopted in 1914 following the sinking of the Titanic with the loss of more than 1,500 lives. Since then there have been four more versions of SOLAS. The current SOLAS was produced from the International Convention on Safety of Life at Sea, which was convened by the International Maritime Organization. The International Convention of Safety of Life at Sea was adopted on November 1, 1974 and went into force on May 25, 1980. The main objective of SOLAS is to protect mariners through legislation of regulations with enforcement from contracting governments abroad.